The 444Hz Calibration vs. the 432Hz Calibration!

by | Jun 17, 2015 | 432Hz, 444Hz, Calibration | 60 comments

I wanted to take a moment to address a subject that frequently comes to me in the form of one question or another. Many people are asking if it might not be better to use the 432Hz calibration to tune with instead of the orchestral standard of 440Hz. They go on to site many articles from the internet regarding the changing of the standardization in years past, and some include theories about why it was changed. I am not going to dwell on these theories nor list any sources for this understanding; there are many available online by using a Google search.

I do not question that the standardization was changed and I do not say that the 432Hz crowd are all wrong, but I do want to give you a reason why I choose to go with the 444Hz calibration for the A note. Actually a friend of mine told me one time when I asked him about the difference, that he believed that some people responded better to the 432Hz calibration and some better to the 444Hz. In fact he had his piano tuned to the 432Hz calibration. So I think there is a value in exploring various approaches.

I have chosen to use the 444Hz calibration because of the understanding I have come to out of the Hebrew text of the book of Numbers – Chapter 7 and Psalms 119. I have that teaching available on YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqSf1L2dxUQ

Because I find these frequencies presented in the ancient scriptures, I have great confidence in them and their ability to affect our lives. The most important frequency that comes out of these 6 that are found in the scriptures is the 528Hz or C note (if you use the 444Hz calibration). Much study and experimentation have been done with this frequency – from Emoto’s work on healing water and frozen water crystal structures, to DNA repair by genetic researchers using this frequency; and others as well. The 528Hz frequency has been given the name, “Miracle Frequency”, “Healing Frequency”, “Creative Frequency” and others reflecting its amazing qualities.

If you use the 432Hz as your calibration, you do not achieve any of these scriptural frequencies in any of the harmonizing notes of the scale you would then produce. The notes produced are actually flat from the standardized tuning. In using the 444Hz calibration the notes are slightly sharp. Interestingly, most professional singers naturally sing slightly sharp. I believe that this is another evidence that the 444Hz calibration is more accurate because this seems to reflect that their DNA is actually telling them to sing sharp or into the 444Hz area. Before I understood these frequencies, I would tune my harp sharp because it just sounded better to me. Now I know why.

I just want to say that I am not saying that I have the final indisputable answer to this issue. I am just as much on a journey of discovery as you all are. I may even change my position at some point down the road. I am just giving you the best information I have at this time. I want to encourage you all to continue to study this out. I believe that there is much more to learn here.

I want to thank you all for your interest and support and invite you to stay tuned (Pun Intended!) as we continue this journey. I also invite you to send me anything you may discover in the process. Until the next one…Enjoy!

60 Comments

  1. Naneaster

    Thank you for the advice on the 444 Hz calibration. I now tune my harp this way and I absolutely love the sound and resonance from my music. I wish I had known about this many years ago but everything has a season. Again, thank you for the great info and the great training videos.

    Reply
    • peregrinnatti

      I’m glad to share – I enjoyed your web site too. Blessings

      Reply
  2. Susie Q

    Hi I am fairly new to your website and to the concept of tuning for C at 528. I was looking at your tuning harp link. What I thought you said was to set your tuner to 444 and tune you instrument accordingly for A & that would give you 528 for C. Which is what I did for my flute. I marked it on my flute head so I could flip back and forth from that to my church orchestra of 440. Then when I was looking at your music notations for psalm 119 what you listed for A was not 444. It was something like 391. So I am a little confused. Can you clarify? Thank you.

    Reply
    • peregrinnatti

      Sorry about the confusion – Disregard the 391. That is from a chart I found early on as I was studying this out. If you are tuning to the 444 Hz A note, your C will be 528. How are you finding the difference – is it making a difference to you as to how the music sounds. Let me know what you are thinking and feeling. Blessings

      Reply
    • Mark

      I was wondering if you could give a list of frequencies for each guitar string for 528 hz tuning

      Reply
  3. lightningnews1

    Dear Steve, I will not be pursuing a September Event in Hawaii. Leonard is very involved in his property battle. I am seeking a venue for that month or thereafter. We are truly in personal & global challenging times. I AM both tuning up & down! I am doing first official publicised event in Hawaii JULY 31. BLESSINGS.AYBE AFTER SEPT WE MEET. ALOHA. AELBERT AEHEGMA

    Reply
    • peregrinnatti

      I understand – until we meet – Blessings and Aloha!

      Reply
      • Andrea Fry

        440 is saten from what i studied

        Reply
  4. Geir M.B. Myklebust

    Thank you for this article. I have tuned my three 12-strings acoustics in 444 Hz for the last year. My musical expression has changed, and the spiritual energy is stronger than ever.

    Reply
  5. Matt

    Hi, a friend of mine would like to know whether the psalms recordings on the right of this page (Free sample music) are recorded at the 444 Hz frequency.
    Thx for reply.

    Reply
    • peregrinnatti

      Most of them are. There are a couple of my early recordings before I discovered 444

      Reply
  6. Sally

    Just found your website today when I decided to tune my autoharp before going to play for hospice. I had read a few things about A444 tuning and your post convinced me, so that’s what I went with. I’ll be poking around to glean more info – thanks for this site.

    Reply
    • peregrinnatti

      Glad you are on to 444- 528. I’m sure you’ll find a difference. Blessings

      Reply
  7. Adrian

    I have been tuning my guitar to triple 4hz for a bit now ever since i read an article about it… it’s an amazing discovery to know why I never thought I was in tune when playing guitar I would always adjust after tuning and ended up higher than standard… always… maybe thats why in music sounds generic and uninspiring in some cases… the problem with tuning to 444hz is most guitars and basses are made to play in standard 440 with set string gauges… the bone nut(the white thing that the strings rest on near the tuners) is usually cut for 10-46 gauge strings… the action is tough to play when tuned higher and if you change your strings to say 9-42 they could buzz alot because they are thinner and don’t rest properly in the string cavities, unless your lucky or have a really nice guitar… it’s tricky!!!

    Reply
    • peregrinnatti

      Thanks for the technical input.Good to know!

      Reply
    • Michael Barber

      As a Luther, I can tell you that whenever you switch to a smaller or larger guage of strings, you should always adjust your guitar’s action and intonation accordingly (via truss rod, saddle height and length adjustments). The same can be said for higher and lower tunings.

      Reply
  8. Shawn Sibley

    When tuning to a 444 i can see the C at 528 hrz but where are the rest of the frequencies found?

    Reply
    • peregrinnatti

      It’s a long answer – I’ll write an article on it in a couple of days – look for it in the posts section.
      Thanks for your interest.

      Reply
  9. Laina

    I tried using the 432 in my string groups. No-one wanted to tune down so low.
    I’ve been using 444 A for about a year and
    it’s a lot easier to play to this. The music just flows better. than in 440 Hz. No-one has issues with the tuning.
    I tuned my harp to the original solfeggio scale
    It’s astounding what has transpired from this.

    Reply
  10. Brian Sundholm

    Thank you for. Sharing! My first inclination was 444. And I second guessed based on 432 suggestions. After asking author Lee Carroll. (Sound engineer. Aka Kryon) he brought up the point that Earths vibration is rising so tune UP! So far I agree with You, & Lee. Soon we will hear how our piano feels about this! I intend to repost with those results.

    Reply
  11. Angela

    I’m just very confused. I’m reading one group of Christianscientists saying 432 is the healing tone another group claims 444 the 432 group seem to think the 444 group are actually using a satanic tone… all including new age spiritualist seem to think 440 us bad so there is that they all agree on that… I’m looking for real healing in my life on every level of being but I certainly don’t want to invite evil unawares… sigh so confusing

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      There’s a lot of confusion out there. That’s why I wrote this post. I believe the Biblical source – 444 Hz is the most believable and with the added understanding of Tabernacle Frequencies I am confident that our Abba Creator had this in mind from the very beginning. I also have confidence in the results – Abba says taste and see!

      Reply
      • Brent

        I am confused. I was told to listen to 444 hz and not 440 hz.

        So I googled 444 hz and found this website.

        Am I listening to 444 hz when you tune the harp to that? I know nothing about music at all.

        How does 444 hz tuning and 528 frequency relate?

        I will be buying some music once I understand. Thanks.

        Reply
        • Steve Rees

          When you use 444hz as the standard for tuning instead of the 440hz concert pitch, when you play the C note above middle C, it becomes 528hz instead of 523hz. The 528hz has been shown to have many benefits. I tune to 444hz as my standard so the 528hz frequency is prominent through the music. Hope that helps:-)

          Reply
          • Brent

            Please tell me the albums tuned in 444 hz with 528 hz. I really enjoyed the scripture reading by the woman. Is that 444?

          • Steve Rees

            Psalms of Aliyah – Harp Mediations – Tabernacle Prayer – Festival of His Birth – and Shalom Power Clips which has Shirley reading scripture.
            Blessings

          • Barbara DeBets

            This may be a strange question…but does what you play the music on change the frequency? If I play the music on my cell phone is it the same frequency as hearing it from the instrument? Shalom
            Thank you for your time and this helpful information

          • Steve Rees

            The frequency stays the same no matter the device unless there is a frequency modulator installed – which would have a control knob.

  12. Tommy

    I discovered 444 Hz and 432 Hz a very short time ago. I am a singer songwriter and play a bluegrass style of acoustic guitar and mandolin. My wife suggested I give these new frequencies a try. My first attempt had dramatic results. Tuned to 444, I played an original tune while slowing down the tempo. I experimented with several songs that evening, that night my wife enjoyed a full nights restful sleep without prescribed medication for the first time in years.

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      Thanks for your story Tommy –
      Many people from many countries are writing me with similar stories – isn’t God good to help us understand and benefit from His awesome design!!!

      Reply
  13. Susan Antelis

    Thank you for this great information. I just got WholeTones from Michael Tyrell. It’s also wonderful! I tuned my dulcimer and ukele to 444 and the sweetness is truly divine!

    Reply
  14. Suzanne dornan

    I am using a Lyon&healy prelude, I started to tune it to 444, so far 3 of the gut strings have broken. Do I need to get a certain type or thickness of string for my harp??? Or should any type of string be able to HD up at 444?

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      My first question is how old are your strings? The difference between 523hz and 528hz is very small. The amount of extra tension using a sharping lever would be more. Second question- are you sure you are on the correct octave? The amount of change on the note calibrated to 440 Hz to that calibrated to 444hz is very small. You should only be turning your tuning pins very slightly. If you give me your phone number I would be glad to call you to help work this out? send your number to steve@calmingharp.com
      Blessings
      Steve

      Reply
  15. Heather Scott

    Hi Steve, do you know where I can buy recordings of the Psalms (tuned to 444 Hz) and sung in Hebrew or Aramaic( ie not orchestral) I live in Australia, blessings, Heather

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      I do not know at this time. I have had a couple of Hebrew speaking people approach me with that idea but it has not happened yet – difficult to get everyone into a recording studio at the same time ?

      Reply
  16. Bill Cote

    I’ve experimented a bit with tuning my guitars to both 444 and 432. I play guitar and sing. Interestingly, at some point in the late ’60s The Beatles all started tuning to 444hz instead of 440. Through their solo albums they continued the practice (listen to John Lennon’s “Imagine,” for example).

    Personally, I find that I get energized as a I play in 444, whereas 440 seems to sap my energy. However, 444 sounds almost too clean and happy for rock music. 432 is perfect for that. Perhaps 444 may be the secret to how Paul McCartney can still be playing tours at his age… I find it amazing that the biggest band in the world, The Beatles, changed their tuning center and no one seemed to notice. I wonder if they learned this during their time in India with Ravi Shankar? India is such a spiritual place.

    Reply
  17. Kathy Hampton

    I first had my piano tuned to A444. It sounded clean and bright, but a little twangy. After about a year, I had it tuned to A432, and it is absolutely thrilling! The lower octaves resonate so beautifully, and the mid- and upper-range are so rich, yet clear. It could just be the dynamics of the piano and the way it is built. I really wanted A444 to sound best because it’s Biblically based. It was definitely better than A440. But now that it’s at 432, I can feel it resonate so well with my body every time I play it, especially the lower octaves. (Maybe it’s just my body, LOL!) My dog seems to love it, too: she comes in whenever I’m playing, lays down near the piano, and sleeps.

    Reply
  18. Nancy Musil

    Where can I get information on how to tune my harp to the 444 hz?

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      Hi Nancy,
      I have a lesson on YouTube that goes over tuning. YouTube.com/Peregrinnatti
      Basically, you use an electronic tuner, I prefer Korg, and calibrate it from A – 440 up to 444 and then proceed with tuning. The C that was 523 Hz now becomes 528 Hz and everything else relative to it.
      Hope that helps.
      Blessings
      Steve

      Reply
  19. Gerald Hapke

    What key on a Keyboard is tuned to 444? I was under the impression it was the A above middle C but I am totally confused. Which is the 523 key? Sorry to be so un-informed.
    Blessings

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      The A above middle C is the standard 440 Hz. If you go to the C above that it will be the 523 Hz.
      If you want to arrive at the C=528 Hz you need to calibrate the A=440 up to 444 Hz.
      Blessings
      Steve

      Reply
  20. Anne

    This is all very interesting. I am experimenting with these tunings on my autoharp that I use for hospice work.

    I am interested in converting an older harp to a therapy harp. I see folks selling these therapy harps online, but no one has published their tunings for the 36 strings. I’m considering a C pentatonic string schedule.

    Is this something you could advise me on? I’ll be spending $$$ on the new strings and I really want to get it right!

    Thanks much!!

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      Hi Anne,
      There’s a company that offers therapy harps and has good information on tuning – several styles.
      http://www.harpkit.com
      If you are using a smaller harp, the strings are laid out in the order of the white keys on a piano. They are usually color coded with the red strings being C notes and the blue being F notes. The clear strings being the notes in between.
      Let me know how it goes ?
      Blessings
      Steve

      Reply
  21. Anne

    Steve – thank you for replying. I have the Reverie harp. It’s quite lovely.

    The project I’m working on is a 36 string autoharp. There are therapy harps of this type (minus chord bars) out there and I hear lovely tunings, but the makers have not published the tunings. I will probably go with a C pentatonic, but I know there’s more interesting string schedules out there – I just can’t figure them out for my autoharp.

    Here’s one I love:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEpB1NGfNjk

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      Harpkit has posted several different tunings for the Revere harp that I think you could transfer to your project.

      Reply
  22. John

    Hi steve, my blessings for your informations. I wanted to share a personal story.

    I did some research about frequencies because everything is formed of matter and quantum states that sub-atomic particles are %99.9 empty and this is called frequency zone.

    I’m an amateur guitarist by the way so i tuned my guitar to A=444 and gave it a shot. I both played and sang alongside. The results were AMAZİNG. I was happy as in my childhood, the energy was flowing in my veins and my skin. I’ve felt it cured my sadness just in minutes…

    I will do more research on this subject but what i know is what i felt was real. Think this frequency is a blessing from our maker. Love you all…

    Reply
  23. Corinne Brosseau

    Hi Steve, I watched your you tube presentation and would like to know how to be able to record my music or calibrate in the 444Hz . I have a Yahmaha MOXF8 Synth. Is there some type of chromatic tuner I can attach to it …company says its tuned to A440 and i could only change it manually by each element voicing (arduous job). Should i just play and try to record at 444Hz. Randy Demain mentioned at one church he was demonstrating/teaching this at, to make sure that their recorder’s ( chromatic tuner) frequency changer was set to the 444. So it is possible to record at 444 with some type of equipment….and.would that work with my electronic keyboards or do you have another suggestion. . Also, what recording device would be needed to do this? I want to play in the biblical freq. 444. Please advise. Thanks…I love the sound of your harp in the 444.

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      If you look at the manual there should be directions for changing the pitch.
      My friend has a keyboard that we were able to change to 444hz.
      Blessings
      Steve

      Reply
  24. Andrea

    I just received my first harp … it is a 27 string therapy harp … i originally wanted to tune up my new harp to 444 hz but a well seasoned harpist said i could harm my harp and should contact my harp maker first. What are your thoughts? She tunes to 432 hz. I just am afraid to break my new harp. Please advise.

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      Hi Andrea,
      I tune my harps and many others and have not seen any problems. I have a post on the website about 444 vs. 432.

      Reply
  25. David D.

    I have always been a fan of A=432 because it resonates with emotions rather than intellect, thus encouraging consciousness to center in the heart rather than in the brain.

    However, I have come to favor A=444. I appreciate your comments about the metaphysical properties of “444”, and the DNA healing and activation properties of 528 Hz (C5).

    Note also the therapeutic properties of 111 Hz (musical note A2). I use a 111 Hz tuning fork to heal soft tissue. For other therapeutic properties, there is a short video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auZIXsW6GhM

    Although not precisely a match (a few cents off), C#6 is pretty close to 1,111 Hz, which is an excellent tuning fork for clearing the aura and clearing living spaces of negative energy.

    A few orchestras (e.g. Boston Symphony Orchestra) tune to A=444. It gives a brighter sound. It is very expensive, however, for non-string instruments to be re-tuned to a different pitch. In many cases, it requires a whole new, specially created instrument, putting a damper on wide-spread implementation.

    One of my wife’s therapists (a knowledgeable sound researcher) suggested that re-tuning our piano to A=444 will help her neuropathy and head trauma brain injuries.

    FYI, There is a list of note frequencies for A=444 tuning at https://pages.mtu.edu/~suits/notefreq444.html

    Thank you for your article, and thank you to the readers who added their own comments to this discussion.

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      Thank you for sharing your resources!?

      Reply
  26. Harp newbie

    To me, the whole frequency numbers are confusing. I have a 22 string harp, so can you just simply tell me what the notes are to be tuned to. For instance my harp starts at C so if 444 is A what does that mean that the A is what an A# then for each A note on the harp or what are the exact frequency numbers for each note then?

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      You set the calibration on a digital tuner (Korg is a good one) so the A note is 444 Hz. Then tune all the other notes relative to the tuner – that will make the C note 528 Hz instead of 523 Hz.
      Blessings
      Steve

      Reply
  27. Dean Patterson

    Just had a question. If you tune 444hz to A i was under the impression A was 432hz as the sound of Om. if you tune to 444hz how do you play a 432hz note if both a A on a keyboard

    Reply
    • Steve Rees

      440 Hz for A is standard calibration. There is a school of thought that believes it should be 432 because that fits into the Fibonacci numbers and the Golden mean. I subscribe to the 444 Hz for the A note because it brings the C up to 528 Hz which I believe is a very important life giving sustaining frequency that is found in Scripture.
      Both have relevance – you choose ?
      Blessings
      Steve

      Reply
  28. Chris Robideaux

    Thanks for this, Steve! Yes, I too, was hearing for years in sort of “esoteric circles” that the 432 Hz tuning was the better alternative. Funny story: a couple of months ago I had some visitors from Europe, one of whom is a musician. I had her sit down at my keyboard (a Roland Juno-DI synth) and she almost immediately said, “Do you know to tune to 432 Hz instead of 440?” and I said, “Yes, I know all about that and have tried that tuning” but had forgotten for some unknown reason that 3 years earlier I had gone into the programmable settings on the Roland and tuned my synth to the 444 A tuning, but for some reason just glossed over it and didn’t want to get into it (probably for the same reasons you cited here). Then, just 2 days ago I was playing and decided to check to see what I had set it to, and voila! 444 Hz. No wonder when I play it it sounds so magnificent! Thanks again for sharing your thoughts here, Steve.

    Reply
  29. Adam

    432 divided by 3 is 144. 144 is biblical also. 444 divided by 3 is 148, if there is a significance there I’m not aware of it. I see 444 in odd places on a regular basis.

    Either tunings are better than 440. Singing in the high range is much easier at 432, as if the notes naturally sit there better. Other classical singers have also stated this.

    Reply
  30. Jon Staid

    Hi Steve, in the article above you mention you have a teaching about the 444 frequency , Numbers Ch7 and Psalm 119. The link didn’t work for me. Can you post a way for me to listen to it?
    Thanks!

    Reply

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